Camping First Aid Kit for Kids and Other Safety Items

Camping First Aid Kit for Kids
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When packing for camping, one of the first items in the car or camper is a camping first aid kit for kids. Over the summer, my kids seem to have permanent scraps and bruises on every knee and elbow. While the band-aid or ice-pack isn’t always needed, they find it comforting none the less. As a mom, it is also reassuring to know that we have the tools to help the problem should anything minor come up. Also note that we are car-campers, and we can bring A LOT of stuff. So a lot of stuff we bring.

Camping First Aid Kit For Kids

This camping first aid kit for kids can be used for adults too! I just make sure to point out children’s specific medications since they come in the liquid form and are easier for them to take. However, wherever it says “children’s” make sure to pack the adult version as well. Of course, adults can have accidents, and first aid kits are needed for them too, but kids seem to acquire most of the camping scraps and cuts.

  • Thermometer
  • Children’s acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  • Children’s Ibuprofen (Motrin)
  • Band-aids (kid designs recommended!)
  • Nose spray
  • Saline solution (for dry eyes or cleaning out wounds)
  • Children’s cough medicine
  • Children’s anti-diarrhea medicine (Imodium)
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Gauze
  • Gauze pads
  • Alcohol wipes
  • Ace bandage
  • Butterfly closure strips
  • First aid medical tape
  • Hydrocortisone cream
  • Children’s antihistamine (Benadryl)
  • Tweezers
  • Scissors
  • Calamine lotion
  • Cotton balls
  • Q-tips
  • Epi-pen (if needed)
  • Instant cold compress or ice-pack
  • Burn relief gel or spray
  • Sunscreen
  • Aloe
  • Bug spray
  • Finger splint

Other Camping Safety Items

Beyond the actual camping first aid kit for kids, there are a few other items that are good to have.

  • Bouillon cubes– These can offer you some good electrolytes should you need them quickly. Plus, bouillon cubes are an emergency meal, and they can settle an upset stomach.
  • Carbon monoxide and propane detector-Newer RV’s or hard sided trailers will typically come with these. However, older models or pop-ups will not always have them. We found a portable battery operated carbon monoxide detector to place in our camper. It’s not as big of a concern in a pop-up since there is some ventilation, but it is still a good safety precaution.
  • Bear spray– This is mace, but it comes in a can that sprays further than mace designed to be used on humans. This can also come in handy for snakes or humans too.
  • Emergency poncho-These ponchos pack up really small and can be useful in an unexpected rain storm.
  • Emergency blanket-An extra blanket can come in handy for the cold, a place to sit on the ground, or by the fire.
  • Water purification tablets-I would only use these in case of an emergency. They are small and pack-able, and could quite literally save your life.
  • Fire extinguisher As mentioned here, you’ll want to have this if your campfire gets out of control. We all want to enjoy our s’mores in peace.

Nice to Have Campy Safety Items

I’ll admit that I do not own these safety items. These items are certainly nice to have if you want to be extra prepared:

  • Tourniquet– If you needed to, you could always make your own tourniquet, but these are designed for proper use and aren’t too pricey.
  • AED– These are expensive. But if you have any heart issues or a need for it, it could be a life saving device. Some of the newer ones will also instruct you through CPR.

Additional Camping Safety Tips

Bear Country

Remember you are usually in bear country when you are camping. Pack up all your food and trash into your car, RV, or designated bear locker. Tents and pop-ups are not adequate for food storage.

Poison Control

As a general rule, it’s best not to eat anything you don’t what it is. Did you ever see Into the Wild? Also, place all medications out of the reach of children. If needed, you can call poison control for free 24 hours a day. The number is (800) 222-1222.

Other Safety Resources

If you want to be extra prepared you can take CPR and First Classes or even Wilderness First Aid Classes. And if you are really into it, you can be trained as a Wilderness First Responder.

Phew, we’ve covered a lot of safety tips over the last few weeks. I feel like it’s important to also remember that even though accidents happen, they are rare and you are camping to relax, enjoy, and have fun. For our family, camping is a way to escape our regular day to day. These safety tips are not meant to be all doom and gloom, but as a way to be prepared. We’ll move away from this topic for now, and focus on lighter and more fun things to come. In the meantime, do you have any other safety tips?

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